Validation of a 3D-printed human temporal bone model for otology surgical skill training

Wade W. Chien, Melville J. da Cruz, Howard W. Francis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hypothesis: Three-dimensional (3D) printed temporal bones are comparable to cadaveric temporal bones as a training tool for otologic surgery. Background: Cadaveric temporal bone dissection is an integral part of otology surgical training. Unfortunately, availability of cadaveric temporal bones is becoming much more limited and concern regarding chemical and biological risks persist. In this study, we examine the validity of 3D-printed temporal bone model as an alternative training tool for otologic surgery. Methods: Seventeen otolaryngology trainees participated in the study. They were asked to complete a series of otologic procedures using 3D-printed temporal bones. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to evaluate their dissection experience on the 3D-printed temporal bones. Results: Participants found that the 3D-printed temporal bones were anatomically realistic compared to cadaveric temporal bones. They found that the 3D-printed temporal bones were useful as a surgical training tool in general and also for specific otologic procedures. Overall, participants were enthusiastic about incorporation of 3D-printed temporal bones in temporal bone dissection training courses and would recommend them to other trainees. Conclusion: 3D-printed temporal bone model is a viable alternative to human cadaveric temporal bones as a teaching tool for otologic surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-93
Number of pages6
JournalWorld Journal of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • 3D-printed temporal bone
  • 3D-printing
  • Otologic surgery
  • Surgical simulation
  • Surgical training
  • Temporal bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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