The role of reactive oxygen species on Plasmodium melanotic encapsulation in Anopheles gambiae

Sanjeev Kumar, George K. Christophides, Rafael Cantera, Bradley Charles, Yeon Soo Han, Stephan Meister, George Dimopoulos, Fotis C. Kafatos, Carolina Barillas-Mury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

221 Scopus citations

Abstract

Malaria transmission depends on the competence of some Anopheles mosquitoes to sustain Plasmodium development (susceptibility). A genetically selected refractory strain of Anopheles gambiae blocks Plasmodium development, melanizing, and encapsulating the parasite in a reaction that begins with tyrosine oxidation, and involves three quantitative trait loci. Morphological and microarray mRNA expression analysis suggest that the refractory and susceptible strains have broad physiological differences, which are related to the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Physiological studies corroborate that the refractory strain is in a chronic state of oxidative stress, which is exacerbated by blood feeding, resulting in increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species, which favor melanization of parasites as well as Sephadex beads.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14139-14144
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume100
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 25 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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