Social-Ecological Resilience of Indigenous Adolescents in the United States and Canada A Situation-Specific Nursing Theory

Christine Hodgson, Timian Godfrey, Rhea N. DeCoteau, Joshuaa D. Allison-Burbank, Ruth Taylor-Piliae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

For the past decade, resilience research with American Indian/Alaska Native and First Nations/Métis/Inuit adolescents has improved our understanding of how adolescents overcome mental health challenges. A new situation-specific theory is presented to guide nurses in applying the evidence to their practice with Indigenous adolescents in the United States and Canada. The social-ecological resilience of indigenous adolescents (SERIA) theory was derived from integrating (a) existing social-ecological frameworks by Bronfenbrenner, Ungar, and Burnette and Figley, (b) findings from a systematic review of 78 studies about resilience factors for mental health of Indigenous adolescents, (c) clinical experience, and (d) Indigenous knowledge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-15
Number of pages13
JournalAdvances in Nursing Science
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2024

Keywords

  • First Nations
  • Indigenous
  • Native American/Alaska Native
  • adolescents
  • mental health
  • nursing
  • resilience
  • situation-specific theory
  • social-ecological

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Nursing

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