Relationship between carotenoids and anaemia during acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children

Veronique Nussenblatt, Glasius Mukasa, Amy Metzger, Grace Ndeezi, Ward Eisinger, Richard D. Semba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A clinic-based cohort study in Kampala, Uganda, was conducted to examine the relationship between severe malarial anaemia and plasma micronutrients. Plasma carotenoids, retinol, vitamin E, and four trace metal concentrations were measured at enrollment and seven days later in 273 children, aged 1-10 year(s), with acute, uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Concentrations of plasma provitamin A carotenoids (p<0.0001), non-provitamin A carotenoids (p<0.0001), retinol (p<0.0001), all four trace elements (all p<0.001), and vitamin E (p<0.0001) rose significantly by day 7 among children without severe anaemia (haemoglobin 70 g/L). There was no change in provitamin A carotenoids (p=0.24) among children with severe anaemia (haemoglobin <70 g/L), whereas non-provitamin A carotenoids (p<0.0001), retinol (p<0.0001), and vitamin E (p=0.011) increased. These observations also support the hypothesis that the use of provitamin A carotenoids increases during malaria infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-214
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Population and Nutrition
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Keywords

  • Anaemia
  • Carotene
  • Cohort studies
  • Cryptoxanthin
  • Lutein
  • Lycopene
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Retinol
  • Tocopherol
  • Uganda
  • Zeaxanthin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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