Progress Report: Next-Generation Sequencing, Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction, and Broad-Range Molecular Assays as Diagnostic Tools for Fever of Unknown Origin Investigations in Adults

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Abstract

Even well into the 21st century, infectious diseases still account for most causes of fever of unknown origin (FUO). Advances in molecular technologies, including broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene followed by Sanger sequencing, multiplex PCR assays, and more recently, next-generation sequencing applications, have transitioned from research methods to more commonplace in some clinical microbiology laboratories. They have the potential to supplant traditional microbial identification methods and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Despite the remaining challenges with these technologies, publications in the past decade justify excitement about the potential to transform FUO investigations. We discuss available evidence using these molecular methods for FUO evaluations, including potential cost-benefits and future directions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)924-932
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume74
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2022

Keywords

  • 16S rRNA gene PCR
  • fever
  • fever of unknown origin
  • metagenomics
  • multiplex PCR
  • next-generation sequencing
  • pyrexia
  • pyrexia of unknown origin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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