Neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes of very preterm infants: latent profile analysis in the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program

Marie Camerota, Elisabeth C. McGowan, Judy Aschner, Annemarie Stroustrup, T. Michael O’Shea, Julie A. Hofheimer, Robert M. Joseph, Rashelle Musci, Genevieve Taylor, Brian S. Carter, Jennifer Check, Lynne M. Dansereau, Semsa Gogcu, Jennifer B. Helderman, Charles R. Neal, Steven L. Pastyrnak, Lynne M. Smith, Carmen J. Marsit, Barry M. Lester, SmithNewby, Jacobson, Catellier, Gershon, Cella, Teitelbaum, Vaidya, Obeid, Rollins, Bear, Lenski, Singh, Msall, Jo, Montgomery, Kuban, Douglass, Jara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Very preterm infants are at high risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. We used a child-centered approach (latent profile analysis [LPA]) to describe 2-year neurobehavioral profiles for very preterm infants based on cognitive, motor, and behavioral outcomes. We hypothesized that distinct outcome profiles would differ in the severity and co-occurrence of neurodevelopmental and behavioral impairment. Methods: We studied children born <33 weeks’ gestation from the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes Program with at least one neurobehavioral assessment at age 2 (Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Child Behavior Checklist, Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, cerebral palsy diagnosis). We applied LPA to identify subgroups of children with different patterns of outcomes. Results: In 2036 children (52% male; 48% female), we found four distinct neurobehavioral profiles. Most children (~85%) were categorized into one of two profiles characterized by no/mild neurodevelopmental delay and a low prevalence of behavioral problems. Fewer children (~15%) fell into one of two profiles characterized by severe neurodevelopmental impairments. One profile consisted of children (5%) with co-occurring neurodevelopmental impairment and behavioral problems. Conclusion: Child-centered approaches provide a comprehensive, parsimonious description of neurodevelopment following preterm birth and can be useful for clinical and research purposes. Impact: Most research on outcomes for children born very preterm have reported rates of impairment in single domains. Child-centered approaches describe profiles of children with unique combinations of cognitive, motor, and behavioral strengths and weaknesses. We capitalized on data from the nationwide Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes Program to examine these profiles in a large sample of children born <33 weeks gestational age. We found four distinct neurobehavioral profiles consisting of different combinations of cognitive, motor, and behavioral characteristics. This information could aid in the development of clinical interventions that target different profiles of children with unique developmental needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-385
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric research
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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