Instrument adaptation and preliminary validation study of the Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire used for assessment of laryngeal symptoms in patients with artificial airways

Martin B. Brodsky, Lisa Aronson Friedman, Elizabeth Colantuoni, Vinciya Pandian, Anne E. Vertigan, Dale M. Needham, Kitty S. Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire (LHQ) was developed to measure abnormal laryngeal sensation and was originally validated in a patient sample from otolaryngologic and respiratory outpatient clinics. Modification is needed for patients who are mechanically ventilated via an endotracheal tube or a tracheostomy tube. Objectives: We sought to adapt and preliminarily validate a modified version of the LHQ appropriate for nurses and other clinicians to administer in acute hospital settings called the LHQ-Acute (LHQ-A). Methods: Internal consistency and construct validity analyses using secondary data from patients at a tertiary teaching hospital who presented with symptoms of laryngeal irritability/hypersensitivity between September 2012 and October 2013 were performed. Results: A total of 131 patients, most complaining of coughing and dysphonia, with a median age of 58 (interquartile range: 48, 66) years and 29 healthy participants with a median age of 62 (interquartile range: 50, 66) years were analysed. The original LHQ was reduced from 14 questions with responses on a 7-point scale to the LHQ-A containing 13 questions with responses on a 4-point scale. Correlations between items of the LHQ and LHQ-A were similar, and internal consistency was excellent and highly comparable, with Cronbach's alpha = 0.906 and 0.902, respectively. Conclusions: The LHQ-A, which has been adapted for nurses and other clinicians to administer to a critically ill patient population, demonstrated comparable reliability and validity to the original LHQ. Validation of the LHQ-A in independent patient populations from acute settings is necessary to better understand norms and changes during recovery from acute illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-143
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Critical Care
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Cough
  • Critical care
  • Intubation
  • Larynx
  • Patient health questionnaire
  • Voice disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency
  • Critical Care

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