Increased synchronization of cortical oscillatory activities between human supplementary motor and primary sensorimotor areas during voluntary movements

S. Ohara, T. Mima, K. Baba, A. Ikeda, T. Kunieda, R. Matsumoto, J. Yamamoto, M. Matsuhashi, T. Nagamine, K. Hirasawa, T. Hori, T. Mihara, N. Hashimoto, S. Salenius, H. Shibasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

In human, both primary and nonprimary motor areas are involved in the control of voluntary movements. However, the dynamics of functional coupling among different motor areas has not been fully clarified yet. Because it has been proposed that the functional coupling among cortical areas might be achieved by the synchronization of oscillatory activity, we investigated the electrocorticographic coherence between the supplementary motor and primary sensorimotor areas (SMA and S1-M1) by means of event-related partial coherence analysis in 11 intractable epilepsy patients. We found premovement increase of coherence between the SMA proper and S1-M1 at the frequency of 0-33 Hz and between the pre-SMA and S1-M1 at 0-18 Hz. Coherence between the SMA proper and M1 started to increase 0.9 sec before the movement onset and peaked 0.3 sec after the movement. There was no systematic difference within the SMA (SMA proper vs pre-SMA) or within the S1-M1, in terms of the time course as well as the peak value of coherence. The phase spectra revealed near-zero phase difference in 57% (20 of 35) of region pairs analyzed, and the remaining pairs showed inconsistent results. This increase of synchronization between multiple motor areas in the preparation and execution of voluntary movements may reflect the multiregional functional interactions in human motor behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9377-9386
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume21
Issue number23
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Electrocorticography
  • Event-related coherence
  • Functional coupling
  • Primary sensorimotor area
  • Supplementary motor area
  • Voluntary movements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience

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