In the era of universal test and treat in Uganda, recent intimate partner violence is not associated with subsequent ART use or viral suppression: Intimate Partner Violence and HIV Care Outcomes

Amanda P. Miller, Eileen V. Pitpitan, Susan M. Kiene, Anita Raj, Sonia Jain, María Luisa Zúñiga, Dorean Nabulaku, Fred Nalugoda, Robert Ssekubugu, Betty Nantume, Godfrey Kigozi, Nelson K. Sewankambo, Joseph Kagaayi, Steven J. Reynolds, Maria Wawer, Jennifer A. Wagman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been associated with delays throughout the HIV care continuum. This study explored prospective associations between experiences of past-year IPV and two HIV care outcomes in the context of current universal test and treat guidelines using two consecutive rounds of an ongoing HIV surveillance study conducted in the Rakai region of Uganda. Longitudinal logistic regression models examined associations between IPV, use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and viral load suppression (VS), adjusting for outcome variables at baseline. To address differences in ART retention by IPV, propensity scores were used to create inverse-probability-of-treatment-and-censoring-weighted (IPTCW) models. At baseline, of 1923 women with HIV (WWH), 34.6%, 26.5%, 13.5% reported past-year verbal, physical and sexual IPV; a lower proportion of persons who experienced physical IPV (79.4%) were VS than those who did not (84.3%; p = 0.01). The proportion VS at baseline also significantly differed by exposure to verbal IPV (p = 0.03). However, in adjusted longitudinal models, IPV was not associated with lower odds of ART use or VS at follow-up. Among WWH in the Rakai region, IPV does not appear to be a barrier to subsequent ART use or VS. However, given the prevalence of IPV in this population, interventions are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1291-1298
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume35
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Uganda
  • intimate partner violence
  • treatment adherence
  • viral suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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