Improving Black Patient Question-Asking and Provider Education During Glaucoma Visits

Betsy Sleath, Delesha M. Carpenter, Scott A. Davis, Donald L. Budenz, Kelly W. Muir, Maria S. Romero, Charles Lee, Gail Tudor, Nacire Garcia, Abena A. Adjei, Alan L. Robin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The objectives of this study were to conduct a randomized, controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a previsit glaucoma video/question prompt list intervention to increase Black patient question-asking and provider education about glaucoma and glaucoma medications during visits. Design: A randomized, controlled trial of a glaucoma question prompt list/video intervention. Participants: Black patients with a glaucoma diagnosis who were currently taking 1 or more glaucoma medications and reported being nonadherent. Methods: One hundred and eighty-nine Black patients with glaucoma were enrolled into a randomized, controlled trial and assigned to either a usual care or an intervention group where they watched a video emphasizing the importance of asking questions and received a glaucoma question prompt list to complete before clinic visits. Visits were audiotaped and patients were interviewed after visits. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were if the patient asked 1 or more questions about glaucoma and glaucoma medications and the number of glaucoma and glaucoma medication areas the provider educated the patient about during the visit. Results: Patients in the intervention group were significantly more likely to ask 1 or more questions about glaucoma than patients in the usual care group (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–10.4). Patients in the intervention group were significantly more likely to ask 1 or more questions about glaucoma medications than patients in the usual care group (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5–5.4). Patients in the intervention group were significantly more likely to receive more areas of education about glaucoma from their providers during visits (β = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.49–1.4). Patients who asked 1 or more questions about glaucoma medications were significantly more likely to receive more areas of education about glaucoma medications from providers (β = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2–2.5). Conclusions: The intervention increased patient question-asking about glaucoma and glaucoma medications and provider education about glaucoma. Financial Disclosure(s): Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-214
Number of pages9
JournalOphthalmology Glaucoma
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2023

Keywords

  • Black
  • Education
  • Glaucoma
  • Question prompt list
  • Question-asking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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