Impact of Affective Disorders on Inpatient Opioid Consumption and Hospital Outcomes Following Open Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adult Spine Deformity

Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Mani Ratnesh S. Sandhu, Benjamin C. Reeves, Tamara Jafar, Samuel Craft, Josiah J.Z. Sherman, Andrew M. Hersh, Andrew B. Koo, Luis Kolb, Sheng Fu Larry Lo, John H. Shin, Ehud Mendel, Daniel M. Sciubba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Affective disorders (ADs) are common and have a profound impact on surgical recovery, though few have studied the impact of ADs on inpatient narcotic consumption. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of ADs on inpatient narcotic consumption and healthcare resource utilization in patients undergoing spinal fusion for adult spinal deformity. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using the 2016–2017 Premier Healthcare Database. Adults who underwent adult spinal deformity surgery were identified using International Classification of Disease, Tenth Revision, codes. Patients were grouped based on comorbid diagnosis of an AD. Demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative variables, complications, length of stay, admission costs, and nonroutine discharge rates were assessed. Increased inpatient opioid use was categorized by morphine milligram equivalents consumption greater than the 75th percentile. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify predictors of increased healthcare recourse utilization. Results: Of the 1831 study patients, 674 (36.8%) had an AD. A smaller proportion of patients in the AD cohort were 65+ years of age (P = 0.001), while a greater proportion of patients in the AD cohort identified as non-Hispanic White (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients in the AD cohort had increased morphine milligram equivalents consumption (P < 0.001). The AD cohort also had a longer mean length of stay (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients in the AD cohort had nonroutine discharges (P = 0.039) and unplanned 30-day readmission (P = 0.041). On multivariate analysis, AD was significantly associated with increased cost (odds ratio: 1.61, P < 0.001) and nonroutine discharge (odds ratio: 1.36, P = 0.035). Conclusions: ADs may be associated with increased inpatient opioid consumption and healthcare resource utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e223-e235
JournalWorld neurosurgery
Volume170
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Adult spinal deformity
  • Affective disorders
  • Healthcare resource utilization
  • Opioid consumption
  • Outcomes
  • Posterior spinal fusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

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