High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

Dayawa D. Agoons, Solomon K. Musani, Adolfo Correa, Sherita H. Golden, Alain G. Bertoni, Justin B. Echouffo-Tcheugui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: Accruing evidence suggests an association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and incident diabetes. However, there is a paucity of data on the link between HDL-C and diabetes, especially among African Americans (AAs). We aimed to assess the association of HDL-C and its fractions with incident type 2 diabetes among AAs. Methods: We included Jackson Heart Study participants who attended visit 1 (2001–2004), were free from diabetes and were not treated with lipid-modifying medications. Incident diabetes was assessed at two subsequent-yearly visits (2 and 3). We cross-sectionally assessed the association of HDL-C and insulin resistance (IR) using multivariable linear models. We prospectively assessed the association of HDL-C and its fractions with incident diabetes using multivariable Cox regression models. Results: Among 2829 participants (mean age: 51.9 ± 12.4 years, 63.9% female), 487 participants (17%) developed new-onset diabetes, over a median follow-up of 8 years. In adjusted models, a higher HDL-C concentration was associated with a lower odds of IR (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation [SD] increment: OR 0.56 [95% confidence interval, CI 0.50–0.63], p < 0.001). In adjusted models, a higher HDL-C concentration was associated with a lower risk of diabetes (HR per SD increment: 0.78 [95% CI 0.71, 0.87], p < 0.001; HR for highest vs. the lowest tertile of HDL-C was 0.56 [95% CI: 0.44, 0.71], p < 0.001). Conclusion: In a sample of African-American adults not on any lipid-modifying therapy, high HDL-C concentrations were inversely associated with the risk of new-onset diabetes. These findings suggest a strong link between HDL-C metabolism and glucose regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere14895
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume39
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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