Growth of Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Is Inhibited by Deep Tumor-Penetrating and Slow Tumor-Clearing Chemotherapy: The Case of Tumor-Adhering Liposomes with Interstitial Drug Release

Sally Stras, Alaina Howe, Aprameya Prasad, Dominick Salerno, Omkar Bhatavdekar, Stavroula Sofou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The poor prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is attributed largely to the lack of tumor-selective therapeutic modalities that effectively deliver lethal doses at the sites of metastatic disease. Tumor-selective drug delivery strategies that aim to improve uniformity in intratumoral drug microdistributions and to prolong exposure of these cancer cells to delivered therapeutics may improve therapeutic efficacy against established TNBC metastases. In this study, we present lipid carriers for selective (due to their nanometer size) tumor delivery, which are loaded with cisplatin and designed to exhibit the following properties when in the tumor interstitium: (1) interstitial drug release (for deeper tumor penetration of cisplatin) and/or (2) intratumoral/interstitial adhesion of the carriers to tumors' extracellular matrix (ECM) - not accompanied by cell internalization - for delayed tumor clearance of carriers prolonging cancer cell exposure to the cisplatin being released. We show that on large multicellular spheroids, used as surrogates of avascular solid tumor regions, greater growth inhibition was strongly correlated with spatially more uniform drug concentrations (due to interstitial drug release) and with longer exposure to the released drug (i.e., higher time-integrated drug concentrations enabled by slow clearing of adhesive nanoparticles). Lipid nanoparticles with both the release and adhesion properties were the most effective, followed by nanoparticles with only the releasing property and then by nanoparticles with only the adhering property. In vivo, cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles with releasing and/or adhering properties significantly inhibited the growth of spontaneous TNBC metastases compared to conventional liposomal cisplatin, and the efficacy of different property combinations followed the same trends as in spheroids. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of a general strategy to bypass treatment limitations of established TNBC metastases due to the lack of cell-targeting markers: aiming to optimize the temporal intratumoral drug microdistributions for more uniform and prolonged drug exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-131
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular Pharmaceutics
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • interstitial drug release
  • intratumoral adhesion
  • liposomal cisplatin
  • pH-triggered adhesion and release
  • TNBC metastases
  • transport heterogeneities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery

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