Empowering Our People: Syndemic Moderators and Effects of a Culturally Adapted, Evidence-Based Intervention for Sexual Risk Reduction among Native Americans with Binge Substance Use

Christopher G. Kemp, Lauren Tingey, Rachel Chambers, Francene Larzelere, Angelita Lee, Laura C. Pinal, Anna M. Slimp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Native American (NA) communities are disproportionately affected by the intersecting, synergistic epidemics of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and substance use. Targeted approaches to addressing these syndemics are critical given the relative scarcity of mental health and behavioral specialists in NA communities. We conducted a series of moderation analyses using data from a randomized controlled trial of the EMPWR (Educate, Motivate, Protect, Wellness, Respect) intervention for reducing sexual risk behaviors, culturally adapted for NA adults with recent binge substance use living on rural reservations. We considered several potential moderators and substance use and sexual risk outcomes at 6-and 12-months post-baseline. Three hundred and one people participated in the study. Age, marital status, educational attainment, employment, and depressive symptoms were differentially associated with intervention effects. EMPWR could be strengthened with the incorporation of additional skills-building related to condom use negotiation with casual partners. For individuals with lower educational attainment or without employment, additional supports and approaches to intervention may be needed. Importantly, this study did not identify intersecting sexual risk and substance use behaviors as moderators of EMPWR effectiveness, suggesting that NA adults with varying levels of risk behavior may be equally likely to benefit from this intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4283
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2022

Keywords

  • Native American
  • binge substance use
  • indigenous
  • moderators
  • sexual risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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