Correlation between DNA transfer and cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell correction after recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 gene therapy

Terence R. Flotte, Erik M. Schwiebert, Pamela L. Zeitlin, Barrie J. Carter, William B. Guggino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2)-based human gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has progressed through a series of preclinical studies and phase I and II clinical trials. This agent has shown an encouraging safety profile, consistent levels of DNA transfer, and positive evidence of short-term clinical improvement in lung function in a prospective, placebo-controlled phase II trial of aerosol administration. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to assess the relationship between its molecular action and the observed clinical improvements, because of the lack of positive results from a highly specific assay for vector mRNA. This issue is further complicated by the fact that the clinical vector utilizes a small cryptic rAAV2 promoter sequence that is less robust for mRNA expression than typical viral promoters. In this paper, we report the results of more sensitive assays performed on primary nasal cells harvested from rAAV2-CFTR gene therapy recipients. These studies demonstrate a correlation between the presence of rAAV2-CFTR vector genomes, CFTR mRNA expression, and cAMP-activated chloride channel function in these cells. The observation of sizeable physiological correction in the face of low mRNA levels may reflect the regulatory role of low levels of CFTR protein as an activator of other chloride channels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)921-928
Number of pages8
JournalHuman gene therapy
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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