Burnout in US hematologists and oncologists: impact of compensation models and advanced practice provider support

Alfred Ian Lee, Leah E. Masselink, Laura M. De Castro, Ariela L. Marshall, Nathan T. Connell, Georgette A. Dent, Josel Fritz, Morgan Homer, Tiffany L. Lucas, Rakhi P. Naik, Marquita Nelson, Casey L. O’Connell, Anita Rajasekhar, Robby J. Reynolds, Deva Sharma, Melody Smith, Lachelle D. Weeks, Clese E. Erikson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Burnout is prevalent throughout medicine. Few large-scale studies have examined the impact of physician compensation or clinical support staff on burnout among hematologists and oncologists. In 2019, the American Society of Hematology conducted a practice survey of hematologists and oncologists in the AMA (American Medical Association) Masterfile; burnout was measured using a validated, single-item burnout instrument from the Physician Work–Life Study, while satisfaction was assessed in several domains using a 5-point Likert scale. The overall survey response rate was 25.2% (n = 631). Of 411 respondents with complete responses in the final analysis, 36.7% (n = 151) were from academic practices and 63.3% (n = 260) from community practices; 29.0% (n = 119) were female. Over one-third (36.5%; n = 150) reported burnout, while 12.0% (n = 50) had a high level of burnout. In weighted multivariate logistic regression models incorporating numerous variables, compensation plans based entirely on relative value unit (RVU) generation were significantly associated with high burnout among academic and community physicians, while the combination of RVU + salary compensation showed no significant association. Female gender was associated with high burnout among academic physicians. High advanced practice provider utilization was inversely associated with high burnout among community physicians. Distinct patterns of career dissatisfaction were observed between academic and community physicians. We propose that the implementation of compensation models not based entirely on clinical productivity increased support for women in academic medicine, and expansion of advanced practice provider support in community practices may address burnout among hematologists and oncologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3058-3068
Number of pages11
JournalBlood Advances
Volume7
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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