Brief novel visual experience fundamentally changes synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex

Shuo Li, Laijian Wang, Xiaoxiu Tie, Kazuhiro Sohya, Xian Lin, Alfredo Kirkwood, Bin Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

LTP has been known to be a mechanism by which experience modifies synaptic responses in the neocortex. Visual deprivation in the form of dark exposure or dark rearing from birth enhances NMDAR-dependent LTP in layer 2/3 of visual cortex, a process often termed metaplasticity, whichmayinvolve changes inNMDARsubunit composition and function. However, the effects of reexposure to light after dark rearing from birth on LTP induction have not been explored. Here, we showed that the light exposure after dark rearing revealed a novel NMDAR independent form of LTP in the layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in visual cortex of mice of both sexes, which is dependent on mGluR5 activation and is associated with intracellular Ca2+ rise, CaMKII activity, PKC activity, and intact protein synthesis. Moreover, the capacity to induce mGluR-dependentLTPis transient: it only occurswhenmice of both sexes reared in the dark from birth are exposed to light for 10-12 h, and it does not occur in vision-experienced, male mice, even after prolonged exposure to dark. Thus, the mGluR5-LTP unmasked by short visual experience can only be observed after dark rearing but not after dark exposure. These results suggested that, as in hippocampus, in layer 2/3 of visual cortex, there is coexistence of two distinct activity-dependent systems of synaptic plasticity, NMDAR-LTP, and mGluR5-LTP. The mGluR5-LTP unmasked by short visual experience may play a critical role in the faster establishment of normal receptive field properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9353-9360
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume37
Issue number39
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2017

Keywords

  • Dark rearing
  • Light exposure
  • Postnatal development
  • Synaptic plasticity
  • Visual cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience

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